On-Demand Briefings | November 1, 2021

On-Demand Briefing: Critical Minerals & Supply Chains for U.S. Energy Storage

Stay Current on Key Industry Thoughts Related to Congressional Priorities

Battery Council International has released the first in its multi-part, on-demand briefings to help policy makers stay in-the know on key topics regarding how to meet U.S. energy storage needs with domestic resources. Each free, 15­–20 minute, pre-recorded session allows listeners to tune-in when convenient.

The briefings share front-line insights from top battery industry and supply chain experts on the current issues and opportunities facing energy storage and manufacturing today: supply chains, infrastructure, battery innovation, and the need for new energy sources.

On-Demand Briefing #1: What You’ll Learn

Today’s global battery market is about $90 billion in value. By 2030, the battery market will grow to about $150 billion annually, and the energy storage required for a low-carbon future will nearly triple. We will discuss how the U.S. can meet its energy storage needs domestically and examine how the U.S. can reclaim its position as a global leader in mineral extraction and processing.

View this on-demand Q&A on the need to secure domestic access to critical materials to:

  • Ensure a low-carbon future
  • Feed supply chains
  • Reduce foreign supply chain vulnerabilities for minerals, such as lithium

 

Participants

Dr. John Uhrie
Dr. John Uhrie

Vice President, Exploration, Research and Technical Development

The Doe Run Company, St. Louis, MO, a natural resources company

Roger Miksad, BCI
Roger Miksad

Executive Vice President

Battery Council International, Washington, D.C., the North American trade association representing battery manufacturing, supply, recycling and distribution companies

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